Mitsubishi updates the ASX with a French face

The new Mitsubishi ASX for Europe debuted with a recognizable face.

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The new Mitsubishi ASX for Europe debuted with a recognizable face.

Mitsubishi updated the ASX crossover with a typical French look.

There’s a good reason for that – the ASX is now a rebadged Renault Captur, at least for Europe. That means it has the same curved slashes for the daytime running lights, the same five-spoke wheels and the same interior. Even the little car on the digital dashboard is a Renault. The only real changes are the logo on the nose and “Mitsubishi” spelled out on the boot.

Rebadging isn’t a bad idea, the Captur is a capable little runabout and changing the logo saves Mitsubishi a lot of money, especially since it already comes with a handful of electrified powertrains, which can be expensive and time-consuming to develop.

The changes between the ASX and the Renault Captur are limited to badging.

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The changes between the ASX and the Renault Captur are limited to badging.

So far, the ASX will be offered with five different engines in Europe, starting with a 1.0-litre triple rated at 67kW/160Nm and paired with a six-speed manual gearbox.

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Next comes a 1.3-litre four-cylinder mild-hybrid with 103kW/260Nm and the same manual transmission, followed by a 116kW/270Nm version of the engine with a seven-speed dual-clutch automatic.

DAMIEN O’CARROLL/SUPPLIED FOOTAGE

Mitsubishi gave the Eclipse Cross a facelift for 2021, along with plenty of hardware in the top-end VRX.

A 105kW/255Nm 1.6-litre ‘full hybrid’ four-cylinder is the fourth option, while the plug-in hybrid takes the same engine and boosts combined output to 118kW/290Nm, with all-electric range of about 50 km.

Hybrids are quite interesting from a technical point of view – they have no clutch, relying on the electric motor to get things done before relying on the petrol engine, which is mated to an automatic at four speeds.

It might sound old-fashioned, but think of it more like replacing the first and second electric motors. There’s also no reverse, which is also handled by the electric bits.

A hybrid option and a plug-in hybrid option will be offered abroad.

Provided

A hybrid option and a plug-in hybrid option will be offered abroad.

A second motor resides in the transmission to control flywheel speed, smooth engagement and start the engine.

Both hybrids use this system, with the plug-in getting a bigger battery and a slightly more powerful secondary motor.

Mitsubishi New Zealand is not yet sure if it will take the new European ASX, telling Things that it is currently in discussion regarding options for the local market, but with no updates to share at this time.

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