The next-gen Mitsubishi Triton won’t have a V6

The next-generation Triton is ready to take on the Ford Ranger and Toyota Hilux.

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The next-generation Triton is ready to take on the Ford Ranger and Toyota Hilux.

Mitsubishi is hard at work on its new Triton, which is expected to boost the tech, luxury and size factors to better battle the likes of the new Ford Ranger. But, according to a new Australian report, it won’t have a six-cylinder engine to rival the new Ranger and its mechanical twin, the Volkswagen Amarok.

Mitsubishi Australia’s senior director of product strategy, Owen Thomson, has hinted to car sales that emissions are the main reason the Triton will avoid a V6.

“Emissions regulations are important and we have yet to see how this plays out [in Australia]because everyone is going to have to manage the CO2 of their fleet,” he said.

The big difference between the Triton and the Ranger will be the number of cylinders.

Richard Bosselman / Stuff

The big difference between the Triton and the Ranger will be the number of cylinders.

“It’s going to be interesting to see how it goes for Ford,” he said, referring to the high level of Australian demand for V6 diesel-powered Ford Rangers.

READ MORE:
* The next-generation Triton will be the first major utility with a PHEV option
* Ford Ranger loses top spot as high cost of living bites into new car sales
* Mitsubishi ASX drops Toyota Hilux in June car sales
* Road test report: Mitsubishi Triton GLX-R 2WD

“Internal combustion engines are becoming increasingly difficult to design as emissions regulations become more stringent. Diesels for example, even now, are working on a knife edge to balance emissions, drivability, combustion noise, all of these factors.

Instead, Mitsubishi will likely offer a new four-cylinder diesel engine or a heavily revised version of its current 2.4-liter engine, as well as a performance-oriented plug-in hybrid model.

According to internet rumors, the PHEV Triton will use a similar configuration to the Outlander PHEV SUV. That means a 20kWh battery pack, an 85kW motor up front with a 100kW motor in the rear, plus a 98kW 2.4-litre naturally aspirated petrol engine allowing for a respectable 185 kW and 450 Nm.

In the Outlander, the all-electric range is 87 km (according to the WLTP test cycle). It’s unclear if that will change for the ute, but we imagine loading the bed or adding a trailer will reduce that.

Rumor has it that the Triton plug-in will use the powertrain from the Outlander PHEV.

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Rumor has it that the Triton plug-in will use the powertrain from the Outlander PHEV.

It’s not the end of the world, as PHEVs can drive as hybrids if necessary to retain the full torque supply, but it would likely segment the Triton plug-in as a lifestyle rather than a workhorse. of work.

Other additions to the Triton will include a bunch of new and improved safety gadgets, with Thomson aiming for a five-star ANCAP rating.

“It’s still part of the Australian requirements for Triton – it has to be a five star ANCAP, no hesitation about that. So it will have a fairly comprehensive ADAS suite.

Towing will also get a bump, currently rated at 3000kg braked, to match the 3500kg of its main rivals, the Ranger and Hilux.

Mitsubishi is expected to unveil its new ute in the first half of 2023. It will also form the basis of the next Nissan Navara.

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